Our Souls Narrative – Paintings & Photographs by Aunia Kahn

“Our Souls Narrative” Paintings & Photographs by Aunia Kahn

Opening Reception: Oct 5, 2012
Show Runs: Oct 12 – Nov 3

Exquisite, haunting, and personal portraiture, which encapsulates the essence of a complete story caught in one fleeting moment in time, is the hallmark of the work of Aunia Kahn. Often referred to as the artist‚s personal interpretation of the world around her depicted in movie-like stills, these images will move the viewer visually with narratives all its own. This exhibition will feature works from her most recent series, and a collection of exclusive black and white images, which depict hardship, triumph, and the power of the human spirit.

Location:
S. Carmody Photography
2707 Sutton Blvd.
Maplewood MO 63143
Info: Info@carmodyphoto.com
314-401-8089

Serrah Russell – NEPO 5K DON’T RUN

NEPO 5k DON’T RUN is back and you are invited!

This year it’s all downhill and backwards. Starting at NEPO House on Beacon Hill and finishing in front of Kobe Terrace Gardens in the International District, participants will encounter nearly 5 kilometers of city streets populated with artwork, installations and performing artists. Finish-line show, MCed by Jake Stratton, will feature live music by Bavarian Village Band, multimedia show by Airport, DJ Never Leaves, performance by Seattle Butoh Festival, DAIPANbutoh dancers and Roz Band, storefront video installations, LxWxH pop-up store, food trucks and beer garden. Once again, expect the unexpected!

Date: Saturday September 8, 2012

Time:
Registration by Vis-a-Vis Society at NEPO House 2:30-4:00pm
Don’t Run 4:00-7:00pm
Finish-line show 6:00-10:00pm

Where:
Start at NEPO House on Beacon Hill (1723 S Lander Street, Seattle, WA 98144)
Finish in front of Kobe Terrace Park in the International District (S Main Street and Maynard Avenue S)

Participating artists:
Vis-à-Vis Society, Britta Johnson, Nathaniel Russell, Paul Komada, Lindsey Apodaca, MKNZ, Ruth Marie Tomlinson, Taylor Pinton, Matthew Hilger, Whitney Ford-Terry, Rumi Koshino, Joanna Lepore, Erin Elyse Burns, Graham Downing, Max Kraushaar, Virginia Wilcox, Hanita Schwartz, Meital Katz-Minerbo, Glenn Herlihy, Leanne Grimes, Brandon Aleson, Ken Turner, Serrah Russell, Sarah Galvin, Riley Christensen, Willie Fitzgerald, Maggie Carson Romano, Eric John Olson, Anne Blackburn, Lauren Max, C.M. Ruiz, Nicholas Nyland, Nat Evans, Chris Kallmyer, Aaron Asis, Anna Koosmann, Stephen Sewell, Julia Haack, Yé-Yé Collective, Fictilis, Kate Clark, George Rodriguez, Jose Bold, Chris Buening, Seth Damm, Keeara Rhoades, A K Mimi Alin, Allyce Wood, Andrew Peterson and meadow starts with p, Andy Fallat, Diana Falchuk, JD Banke, Eric E. Aguilar, NKO, Devon Midori Hale, Keely Isaak Meehan and Manifold Motion, Bryan Schoneman, Zack Bent, Jennifer Zwick, Rodrigo Valenzuela, Amanda Manitach, Alice Ghosti, Monica Mata Gilliam, Baso Fibonacci, and Seanjohn Walsh.

Curated by Klara Glosova, Sierra Stinson and Zack Bent.

What else you may need to know: this event is free to the public, with suggested donation of $5. Participants of all ages welcome, feel free to invite anyone and everyone you know, there is no maximum capacity! You are encouraged to take Light Rail to the start, NEPO House is located one block from Beacon Hill’s Light Rail Station.

Hope to see you there! And remember: absolutely no running!

nepohouse.org

NEPO 5K DON’T RUN is organized by NEPO House. NEPO House is an Associated Program of Shunpike.
This event is made possible by funding from 4Culture and the City of Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs. This program is also supported, in part, by a grant from the Washington State Arts Commission, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

The LunchBox Gallery – 2nd opening night of the “Summer Photo Show 2012” – Sept 8th!

Hello LunchBoxers!

We are pleased to invite you to the second opening night of the acclaimed annual group exhibition “Summer Photo Show 2012“, this September 8th from 7-10 pm (though we will be open since noon – 12pm). The show features the photography work of fourteen artists. The showcased pieces are a result of a call for entries oriented to national and international visual artists working in all styles of contemporary photography including any mixed-media art that utilized photography as one of its forms of expression. All photographic methods, formats, types and schools were welcomed.

In this show, The Lunch Box Gallery is exhibiting works of insightful conceptual ideas materialized through exceptional craftsmanship, which are intended to represent fascinating takes and points of view in photography nowadays. The thought behind the image of the artist is very important in this show, yet as important as the final visible result. The range of photography tendencies to be found in the exhibition is vast: from conceptual and documentary photography, to narrative photography, photo-essay, iPhoneography and photo-collage; touching on topics like obsessive-compulsive tendencies, the demystification of the “happily ever after”, performative images that play with childhood materials to reflect on how they determine us, or the mistreated young Muay Thai boxers from a Bangkok slum. They all convey on representing an individual concept and a very particular way of externalizing it.

Photographers participating in the show include:

Sarah Tortora (Connecticut), John William Keedy (New York), Noah David Bau (Boston/Bangkok), Amy Leibrand (Ohio), Miranda Maynard (North Carolina), Lissette Schaeffler (Miami), Aimee Hertog (New Jersey), Dafna Steinberg (Washington DC), Ted Oonk (The Netherlands), Luisa Mesa (Miami), Troy Colby (Kansas), Ramesh Pithiya (Washington DC), Naimar Ramirez (Puerto Rico) and Tracy Thomas (California).

A few lines about the artists and their artworks…

Sarah Tortora (Connecticut) – Sarah’s photographs in this show address displacement by organizing unrelated objects within the frame, where the addition of an anonymous subject in these works further frustrates one’s ability to establish a narrative within the contents of the image; reminding us of our existence in a world of constant material experience and exchange. Her work explores the experiences of the product shot versus the object it depicts, where the product shot arguably fetishizes and idealizes the object to a greater extent than the object can ever achieve for itself.

John William Keedy (NY)- This visual artist is exhibiting three pieces from his intriguing series “It’s Hardly Noticeable”, which explores the complex and meticulous world of a character who is caught between an overwhelming drive to yield to his compulsions and an undeniable desire to blend in with those around him. The portrayed scenarios are the result of a man who struggles to reconcile himself with his differences and obsessions, attempting to find a balance. This series has become a performative way for the artist to indulge his own anxieties.

Noah David Bau (Boston/Bangkok) – He is participating in the show with “This Is My Body”; a series of portraits depicting young professional Muay Thai boxers at a training camp in Bangkok’s most notorious slum. His aim is to deliver the viewer to the intersection of adolescence, commerce, beauty, and brutality, photographing boys that have been orphaned or neglected and discarded, subjected to grueling workouts, brutal body punishment and trained to be merciless. Noah realized these boys are at once admired and unwanted, savage and forlorn, innocent and jaded, becoming inspired to create this series and illuminate these contradictions.

Amy Leibrand (Ohio) – Amy is featuring two pieces from her series “Tensional Perspectives”, which explores situations and conditions characterized by speculative future outcomes. Can we not escape the limitations that define our presence? By exploring the dynamics of boundaries and placements, one’s sense of identity dissolves, bringing about disorientation, but also the possibility of new perspectives.

Miranda Maynard (North Carolina) – “Manners” is a series of conceptual photographs that focuses on the body and food as intimate cultural symbols, and on play as a means of self- determination. Miranda’s work is a process of performing with childish materials and bright colors that were captivating to her in her childhood, but that nevertheless are relevant to a broader audience. She believes there is something infectiously exciting about seeing people playing with the materials they want to play with.

Lissette Schaeffler (Miami) – This photographer is featuring two pieces from her series “By The Hour”, which portrays the rooms of the typical “Pay by the Hour” motels in Miami. The artist incorporated the element of surprise, but never asking to see the rooms before paying for them; like having a rendezvous between the space and herself. What’s really behind this project is the artist’s personal need to discover if she could photograph the urban landscape as comfortably as she did her portraits; finding out she approached them very similarly, treating the rooms as sitters and ultimately becoming portraits of the space.

Aimee Hertog (New Jersey) – Aimee’s work explores what it means to be feminist in a post-feminist era through her series “Defying Gravity”. Starting with sculpture, the artist manipulates wedding gowns to explore the reality behind the myth of living “happily ever after”, and then superimposes them onto claustrophobic, two-dimensional, photographic landscapes. That is how her photographic narratives are created to reflect a disillusionment with contemporary society by emphasizing the dichotomy between “natural” and “artificial”, and highlighting the difficulty women have constructing and retaining their identities in a culture that favors traditional gender roles.

Dafna Steinberg (Washington DC) – Dafna is what you can recognize as an integral artist. Working in photography, video and mixed media, she brings us her complex photographic collages. Always fascinated by details and things in fragment, her series “Little Monsters” takes the spectator’s imagination in a different direction, allowing him/her to wander through different story lines. Her inspiration comes from dreams, the media and how she sees the world, utilizing magazine cut outs, vintage postcards and photographs of unknown people.

Ted Oonk (The Netherlands) – The artist is exhibiting two images from her series “The too-aesthetic database”, a series of non-fictional photographs on her sister Pim who has Down Syndrome. Ted’s work stem from a fascination and discontent that she has in relation towards the way we deal with matters that deviate from the norm, and how imagery contributes to the way we stigmatize. Aesthetic, poetry and intimacy play a great part in her work as well as awkwardness and the pained, providing another kind of perfection which becomes a challenge to keep up with in this image-ruled world.

Luisa Mesa (Miami)- Luisa is renowned by her mixed-media collages that also incorporate illustration, drawing, photography, painting and digital manipulation. The artist interprets our reality as the manifestation of an invisible force that animates it, where life is not flat but full of layers beneath the surface. Luisa introduces old portraits into her work, juxtaposing the old and the new and ‘giving them life’ in a contemporary setting, thus allowing them possibilities they may have never had.

Troy Colby (Kansas) – Trough his series “The Return”, Troy reflects about how in all the midst of the modern advances, we are losing ourselves daily to this life that has lost touch with just being human. We struggle to maintain, control and advance over nature, even in beauty. As age creeps up we do everything to fight it and try to withhold the process from taking place, yet at some point we start to come to an area of acceptance and peace. We have to either put faith in what is to come, or just do not have any more fight left in us. This is the point where we are returning back to where we came, an earlier condition or place; and that’s what is revealed in Troy’s images.

Ramesh Pithiya (Washington DC) – Ramesh creates photographs, sculpture, and site-specific installations that explore how we rely on photography to provide our memories of personal experiences, to frame our understanding of who we are, and to shape and preserve our collective memory of historical events. Inspired by our instinct as archivists, gathering and sifting through the documents and objects, his work documents temporary still life structures that combine political, social and personal material within sculptural compositions; bearing witness to experience how used things or how things can be used in another context, which find their relationship in our daily life.

Naimar Ramirez (Puerto Rico) – Her work presents questions about identity and its relationship to images, reflecting on the dichotomy between what is seen and what is projected through the creation of masks. As intermediaries between the wearer and the outside world, the masks strive to show some ways in which individuals are represented, and how much ‘truth’ can be communicated through this depiction; also, how we re-create ourselves in response to our context by manipulating our own image. Working with what seem to be wearable, interchangeable pieces like free magazines, the viewer can feel as though they can pick and choose what they need, or would like to be like, making of the image/identity a usable object. At the end, Naimar works with a general approach to the way our self-image is informed by outside events and propaganda.

Tracy Thomas (California) – Well-know iPhoneographer, each of Tracy’s montage pieces are shot and edited entirely on an iPhone4; a device that for sure has provided her wings to the whimsical, sometimes bizarre and oft-times humorous alter-ego buried deep inside her. By combining the old with the modern element, Tracy juxtaposes photographs taken prior to the 1940’s with her own shot background elements, reflecting on the contents of the leftover creative imaginings of her childhood mind, bringing to life interesting characters of her dreams.

 

The Lunch Box Gallery

310 NW. 24th St. Miami, FL 33127
http://www.facebook.com/thelunchboxgallery
http://www.thelunchboxgallery.com

Fictional Eyes: The Dreams of Reason” photography show at The Lunch Box Gallery

Miami, FL – The Lunch Box Gallery, in conjunction with contemporary art webzine from Spain, Area Zinc, are pleased to announce the new exhibition Fictional Eyes: The Dreams of Reason, showcasing the photographs of 8 artists who have been previously published in Area Zinc. The opening reception is on May 12th, 2012 from 6:00pm to 10:00pm at 310 NW. 24th St. Miami, FL 33127.

After a rigorous selection process, a body of works have been chosen that convey the idea of photography as an exercise for the imagination. All the pieces in this show reveal fictional situations, scenarios, objects and even narratives that defy not only the way we see and associate the elements that surround us, but as well challenge the limits of photography as an art form. The artworks confront the traditional idea that a photograph reflects reality, and they also deal with the diversity of outside influences that photographers have incorporated into their images when utilizing other methods of creation and techniques that weren’t necessarily there in the original take.

 

 

The use of technology, digital manipulation, 3D design, illustration, collage, graphics tablet, among many others, indeed transform the image to become “something else”, taking the shape of oneiric expressions and illusions that unleash conceptual and personal imaginations. Nevertheless, even though many of the images reveal nonexistent places, forms and circumstances, they all depart from elements of real life taken with a camera, and at the end, they may become verisimilar to the eye of the beholder thanks to the mastery in merging all the elements together; just like a dream that feels real when dreaming it. Pre-conceived techniques during the taking of the photograph as well as in post-production, become the set for the visual trap, making the impossible, possible.

Awe, curiosity, open conclusions and unlimited meanings arise from the sometimes unconnected imagery that we observe, stimulating the individual appropriation of the photograph by giving the connotation each viewer wants to assign. Here, concept and technique together omit the laws of reason, entering into the dreams of those who create with fictional eyes.
Photographers participating in the show include Sandra Torralba (Spain), Stefano Bonazzi (Italy), Christopher Lee Donovan (USA), Michel Rajkovic (France), Serrah Russell (USA), Kaveh Hosseini (Germany), Polly Chandler (USA), Alba Tenas (Spain).

Fictional Eyes: The Dreams of Reason will be opened to the public on Saturday, May 12th from 6:00pm during the popular Gallery Walks, at 310 NW 24th. St. Miami, FL 33127 (Wynwood Art District). Nevertheless, the gallery will be open that same day since 1:00pm.

More about Area Zinc: Founded in 2007 in Spain, this internationally renowned webzine is directed by Andres Vargas. More than 30 thematic editions have been published throughout the years, showcasing the artworks of more than 1,000 artists from all around the world. Area Zinc has been successfully giving voice to all mediums which include illustration, painting, sculpture, photography and more, always focused on representing the latest tendencies of these art forms. For more information, please visit http://www.area-zinc.com

The Lunch Box Gallery
310 NW. 24th St. Miami, FL 33127
http://www.thelunchboxgallery.com

Antonio Santin – Solo show at MARC STRAUS Gallery NEW YORK

April 1st – May 6th, 2012
Opening Reception: Sunday, April 1st 5 – 7pm

299 Grand Street
New York, NY 10002
Marc Straus is pleased to present an exhibition of new large-scale paintings by Antonio Santin on the occasion of his first solo exhibition in New York.

Santin constructs eerie, arresting compositions that simultaneously attract and unsettle in their evocative depictions of sublimated desire. He orchestrates elaborate still-lifes, manipulating both objects and the human form to construct a space he describes as “more real than reality itself.” Each painting originates from a theatrically composed photograph by Santin, which itself is the result of a deliberate process. Visiting his subjects in their homes, he chooses their outfits and accessories from their personal belongings to assemble each vignette. He then transforms this photographic record into a painterly construct in oil on canvas that vacillates between a mimetic three-dimensional space and a heightened reality augmented by surprising shifts in texture and gesture. He creates a visceral tension between surface and space with a range of techniques that incorporate both the technical foundations of classical painting and unexpected alterations to the qualities of oil paint to re-assemble the sensory experiences of everyday life. Deeply rooted in the tradition of Spanish Tenebrism as well as his own training as a sculptor, Santin juxtaposes flattened planes with tangible forms carved by light and shadow to create a continuous perceptual dialogue in each work.

This exhibition brings together three related series of works from late 2011-2012 that incorporate the human form as a fetishized object to be hidden or revealed in images that often conjure a cinematic aesthetic. In works such as Der Damm des Riesen (2012), Santin furthers his interest in latent sexuality intertwined with morbid overtones. The rug series evolved from his ongoing interest in the opacity of fabric as a device to obscure the body with abstract patterns and textures. Each of these works brings the background into the foreground while a discernible figure hovers beneath the surface. In the monumental We Rot (2012) the wavering, raised carpet patterns contrast with the translucent, tonally complex base. At more than twelve feet wide, the intimate details invite close viewing while the outlines of a figure emerge from a distance. In Fiebre Amarilla (2011), the lumps and bulges underneath this carpet inject a corporeal uncertainty into this geometric canvas. His newest series of crocheted landscapes of the female form are at once a technical accomplishment of texture and a formal repositioning of the body as a distinct yet abstract mass.

Antonio Santín was born in Madrid, Spain in 1978. He received his Degree in Fine Arts from Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2005. He was an artist in residence at Kunstlerhaus Glogauer in Berlin (2006) and Centre dárt Contemporani Piramidon in Barcelona (2007). He has exhibited internationally and is represented in the collections of Centre national des arts plastiques, Paris and Museu Europeu d’Art Modern, Barcelona as well as among numerous private collections worldwide. Public installations include a permanent sculpture commissioned by the city of Madrid in 2003. Antonio Santín lives and works in Berlin.

 

MARC STRAUS
299 Grand Street
New York, NY 10002
P: 212-510-7646
F: 212-510-7647

Hours
Wednesday – Sunday: 11:00-6:00
Monday and Tuesday by appointment

http://marcstraus.com

http://www.antoniosantin.com

MAGDALENA ESTEVE en EAT MEAT

Hola de nuevo, estimados,

Eat Meat Raw Gallery tiene el grandísimo honor de presentar a la que considera una de sus maestras plásticas y espirituales con la que, increíblemente, resulta ser su primera exposición individual, que ha sido concebida y realizada expresamente para la ocasión.

MAGDALENA ESTEVE@ EAT MEAT
Inauguración Sábado 11 de Febrero a partir de las 19.30
Exposición del 11 de Febrero 2012 al 10 de Marzo 2012.

Magdalena Esteve es una pintora de tan sobrecogedora precisión que su clasificación resulta imposible. Sus autorretratos en un mundo sumergido, su visión apocalíptica del cambio interior, su maestría captando y representando la luz, y las rarísimas ocasiones en que su obra ha sido exhibida públicamente la convierten en una de las más brillantes artistas desconocidas, auténtico mito viviente para los que alguna vez han podido ver alguna de sus obras, y ejemplo de artista comprometida con su obra, no con su carrera… lo que nos ha costado convencerla.

La exposición se compone de dos bloques bien distintos:

La primera parte de esta exposición: ‘Las hormigas y el cielo‘, es un impresionante mural que parece realizado casi inconsciente y autómaticament: cuarenta láminas minuciosamente trabajadas con bolígrafo sobre base fotográfica y luego escrita, y que es, en crudo, el orígen formal y conceptual de la siguiente.

La segunda parte y resolución espectacular: ‘La Luz de las hormigas‘, un tríptico de pares de pinturas eléctricas; una gigantesca composición en diagonal en la que la parte central se abre en una espiral que parece no finalizar en los márgenes del soporte hasta irrumpir y continuar en el siguiente, representando los diversos universos mentales superponiéndolos hasta crear una profundidad ilimitada.
Estos seis cuadros funcionan de forma independiente, por parejas, y también como una sola unidad.

Estamos tan entusiasmados que hemos decidido alargar excepcionalmente la duración de esta exposición, que estará visitable en nuestros horarios habituales hasta el 10 de marzo. Esto es ‘otra cosa’ de verdad.

 

EatMeat: Cierre exposición LIBIDO

Hola estimados,

El próximo Sábado 14 despedimos nuestra exposición colectiva navideña LIBIDO.

Entre nuestros limitados horarios y lo complicado de las fechas muchos corréis el riesgo de acabar no habiendo visto la exposición. Que vale la pena.

Así que hemos desempolvado nuestro tradicional y torero vermut-matutino-que-suele-alargarse-amablemente-hasta-la-hora-del-cierre.

Abriremos puertas de 12 a 21. Alrededor de las 13.30 tendremos una actuación especial: Opus Oct Opus, recreación estilizada, en directo, de una danza-lucha ritual de algunas islas de la Micronesia, donde la Vestal desnuda se enfrenta al Pulpo gigante. Y va en serio.

Después cocinaremos y nos comeremos al pulpo. A la gallega. Y va en serio también.

Por la tarde se podrá ver la exposición con cierta calma.

Así que estáis todos invitados.Saludos cordiales.

:::  EAT MEAT Raw Gallery ::: C/Alzina nº 20 ::: 08024 Barcelona  :::  http://www.eatmeat.cat :::